2016 FRIB In the News

Solving a heavy-duty mystery

, Fox 47 News

To determine how the universe’s heavy elements – gold, silver and many others – came about, a team of international researchers is studying both the largest and smallest things known to us – stars and atoms. The team, led by scientists from MSU, is providing critical data to computer models of what are known as stellar events – supernovas and neutron stars mergers, to be exact.

Astronomers pinpoint how Milky Way Galaxy was formed

, Fox 47 News

Using colors to identify the approximate ages of more than 130,000 stars in the Milky Way’s halo, astronomers have produced the clearest picture yet of how our galaxy formed. The astronomers are part of JINA-CEE – the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics – Center for the Evolution of the Elements – which is headquartered at MSU.

Nearly 4,000 attendees learn about FRIB

, Fox 47 News

Nearly 4,000 members of the public attended the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory open house on Aug. 20. The "Rare Access” event included activities, demonstrations, presentations and tours.

Facility for Rare Isotope Beams sneak peak draws in hundreds

, WLNS TV-6

People in East Lansing had the chance to tour the facility for rare isotope beams on Michigan State University’s campus. The “Rare Access” event was hosted by nuclear scientists who gave presentations on rare isotope research they’re currently working on.

Hundreds pack into FRIB during open house

, Lansing State Journal

Hundreds of people lined Shaw Lane on Michigan State University's campus Saturday to get a peek inside what's soon-to-be the world's most powerful rare isotope research facility. MSU's Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, or FRIB, opened to the public for the first time this weekend.

Public offered tours of Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

, My San Antonio

The public is being offered tours of a nuclear science facility that's being built at Michigan State University. A free open house is scheduled 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Aug. 20. Scientists will be on hand to offer information. Demonstrations also are planned.

Public offered tours of Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

, The Washington Times

The public is being offered tours of a nuclear science facility that’s being built at Michigan State University. A free open house is scheduled 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Aug. 20. Tours will be available of the 570-foot-long underground tunnel where beams of charged particles will travel at half the speed of light before colliding.

Capitalize on FRIB cooperation (editorial)

, The Lansing State Journal

The $730 million Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, under construction at MSU and expected to be fully operational in 2021, ensures the university will be at the forefront of rare isotope research for years to come. The facility also will draw world-class scientists here from around the world to conduct their research. And it will encourage entrepreneurs to locate here to capitalize on the science and the highly trained human capital.

High-tech business brings opportunity to Lansing

, Greater Lansing Business Monthly

MSU’s NSCL, FRIB, and high-tech businesses are the starting point for an ambitious initiative to broaden the Lansing region’s nuclear industry footprint. To the economic development leaders, this compact foundation is an opportunity for new cutting-edge businesses and high-paying jobs.

Lansing's becoming the Silicon Valley of particle acceleration

, Lansing State Journal

Proponents of the capital region say the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, or FRIB, a $730 million project funded primarily by the U.S. Department of Energy and being built at Michigan State University, creates an opportunity to make Lansing the particle accelerator capital of the country.

Stellar idea: ORNL physicist aims for the stars with JENSA system

, Newswise

SuperORRUBA detectors will play a big role in the JENSA experiment at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. It will form the main target for the proposed SEparator for CApture Reactions at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams.

Gold creation requires cataclysmic event

, The John Hopkins News-Letter

Scientists are still searching for the complete story behind the formation of heavy earth metals, but they have narrowed down the possibilities to two likely sources. Michigan State University (MSU) researchers along with colleagues from Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany are currently using computer model simulations to investigate the two possibilities: a supernova collapse and the collision of two neutron stars.

State grant to help pay for roads around physics facility

, San Francisco Gate

State officials have awarded a $3 million grant for road projects to support the operation of a nuclear science facility being built at Michigan State University.

State contributes $3 million for roads around MSU

, WLNS-TV

The Michigan Department of Transportation announced the state transportation economic grant will help pay for five associated road projects that will improve traffic flow around FRIB.

Gold star: Seeking the origin of gold in the universe

, The Science Daily

Michigan State University researchers, working with colleagues from Technical University Darmstadt in Germany, are zeroing in on the answer to one of science's most puzzling questions: Where did heavy elements, such as gold, originate?

Could gold have galactic origins?

, R&D magazine

An international team of researchers from the University of Michigan and Germany’s Technical University Darmstadt are exploring that elemental compounds like gold and uranium originate from space.

Gold star: Seeking the origin of gold in the universe

, Phys.org

Michigan State University researchers, working with colleagues from Technical University Darmstadt in Germany, are zeroing in on the answer to one of science's most puzzling questions: Where did heavy elements, such as gold, originate?