Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics - Center for the Evolution of the Elements

The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics - Center for the Evolution of the Elements (JINA-CEE) is a National Science Foundation (NSF) Physics Frontiers Center that addresses fundamental questions about the nature of extremely dense matter in the cosmos, and the origin of the chemical elements that make up our world.

JINA-CEE is a unique interdisciplinary research network that links rare isotope science with the physics of stable isotopes, the physics of stars and stellar explosions, and modern multi-messenger astronomy that includes ground and space-based observatories, neutrino observatories, and gravitational wave detectors. The network brings together nuclear experimentalists, nuclear theorists, astronomers, theoretical astrophysicists, and computational physicists from 26 institutions in eight countries. By enabling rapid communication, exchange of data, and coordination across field boundaries, JINA-CEE advances the scientific frontiers in nuclear astrophysics.

Learn more at the JINA-CEE website.

International Research network for Nuclear Astrophysics (IReNA)

The International Research network for Nuclear Astrophysics (IReNA) connects the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics - Center for the Evolution of the Elements (JINA-CEE) with five similar interdisciplinary research networks to form a network of networks. IReNA involves scientists from 17 countries and enables communities to take advantage of complementary international capabilities in nuclear astrophysics research and education, thus greatly accelerating scientific progress.

The IReNA research networks are: Chemical Elements as Tracers of the Evolution of the Cosmos (ChETEC) across Europe; the ExtreMe Matter Institute (EMMI) and the Collaborative Research Center “The Milky Way System”(SFB 881) – both in Germany; the Japan Forum of Nuclear Astrophysics/UKAKUREN in Japan; the international Nucleosynthesis Grid collaboration (NuGRID) in North America, Australia, and Europe; and JINA-CEE in the United States and eight other countries. Together, IReNA scientists have access to a variety of accelerators, astronomical observatories, experimental equipment, data, and computer codes.

IReNA also creates exchange programs, innovative workshops, and retreats to foster network communication and training of the next generation of scientists.

Learn more at the IReNA website.