2020 FRIB In the News

Mitch Allmond: Shaping a better fundamental understanding of matter

, Mirage News

In the Physics Division of the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, James (“Mitch”) Allmond conducts experiments and uses theoretical models to advance our understanding of the structure of atomic nuclei, which are made of various combinations of protons and neutrons (nucleons). Allmond currently looks forward to DOE’s Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). He is a leader developing instrumentation for FRIB, in particular the FRIB Decay Station, which is led by ORNL and University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

Cosmic understanding: Identifying distinctive signatures of heavy elements

, PHYS.org

The ability to probe heavier elements will be used to further explore research on possible environments for making these elements. This research can help to target experiments at future nuclear physics accelerators such as the forthcoming Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), which is set to begin running experiments in 2022.

MSU researchers participate in discovery that challenges nuclear theory

, MSUToday

A team of researchers, including scientists from the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, or FRIB, and the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, or NSCL, at MSU, have made a discovery that could change how scientists understand fundamental forces acting inside atomic nuclei.

Researchers test the way we understand forces in the universe

, Phys.org

A team of researchers, including scientists from FRIB and the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University, have made a discovery that could change how scientists understand fundamental forces acting inside atomic nuclei.

Evolution of shell structure in exotic nuclei

, Reviews of Modern Physics

Michigan State University Professor Alexandra Gade collaborated with international colleagues for a Reviews of Modern Physics article about the evolution of shell structure in exotic nuclei.

MSU leads in world-class nuclear science research, graduate education (MSU-sponsored content)

, MLIve

Michigan State University has the No. 1-ranked graduate program in nuclear physics, according to the U.S. News and World Report. That’s why the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science selected MSU to design, build and operate the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, which will be the world’s most advanced superconducting heavy-ion linear accelerator and our nation’s newest “discovery machine” when it becomes fully operational in 2022. (Note: This is MSU-sponsored content and may be blocked by ad-blocking software.)