12 Jan

Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning Applications at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

12 January 2024 - 3:00 PM
Online via Zoom
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Daniel Fried Ratner

Show/Hide Abstract
Across the DOE, the wealth of data, robust automation, and stringent requirements for control, simulation, and data acquisition, make "Big Science" experiments - telescopes, particle accelerators, etc. - ideal targets for AI/ML. At the same time, the flavor of AI/ML techniques differ from those found in industry. In this talk, I will show some example AI projects at SLAC, including autonomous optimization of an x-ray laser, anomaly detection for a particle accelerator, and single-particle imaging of biomolecules (an example of an inverse problem). I will also highlight how these same methods can find use in other science domains.
19 Jan

Study of Zinc-60 for the Astrophysical Rapid Proton Process

19 January 2024 - 10:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
FRIB Graduate Research Assistant

Gerard Jordan Owens-Fryer

Show/Hide Abstract
Committee: Artemis Spyrou (Chairperson), Paul Gueye, Heiko Hergert, Wade Fisher, Wolfgang Kerzendorf
19 Jan

Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics: Present and Future of Nuclear Astrophysics at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso

19 January 2024 - 2:00 PM
2025 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
LNGS

Federico Ferraro

Show/Hide Abstract
The LUNA (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) experiment is located at the LNGS (Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso) in Italy. LUNA is aimed at studying the nuclear reactions that are responsible for the synthesis of the elements and shape the life of stars in the universe. The reduction of the cosmic-rays induced background provided by the 1400 m thick rock overburden at LNGS allows the direct measurement of the cross section in the energy range relevant to astrophysics. The LUNA-400 accelerator is in operation since 2001 and is able to produce H+ and He+ beams using a terminal voltage as high as 400 kV with beam currents up to a few hundreds of microampere. It was mainly focused on reactions relevant to solar physics and hydrogen burning. The new LUNA-MV accelerator has been recently commissioned. It will provide ion beams of H+, He+, C+ and C++ using a terminal voltage as high as 3.5 MV with comparable beam currents. It will allow the study of nuclear reactions involved in more advanced phases of stellar evolution, responsible for the synthesis of heavy elements. This seminar will provide an overview of the LUNA experiment, with a focus on the experimental program at the LUNA-MV accelerator, that is part of the new Bellotti Ion Beam Facility of the LNGS.
21 Jan

Advanced Studies Gateway Event

21 January 2024 - 1:00 PM
Online via Zoom
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard Medical School, and Massachusetts General Hospital

Emery Brown

Show/Hide Abstract
"General anesthesia is a drug-induced, reversible condition comprised of five behavioral states: unconsciousness, amnesia (loss of memory), antinociception (loss of pain sensation), akinesia (immobility), and hemodynamic stability with control of the stress response. Our work shows that a primary mechanism through which anesthetics create these altered states of arousal is by initiating and maintaining highly structured oscillations. These oscillations impair communication among brain regions. We illustrate this effect by presenting findings from our human and non-human primate studies using high-density EEG recordings and intracranial recordings. These studies have allowed us to give a detailed characterization of the neurophysiology of loss and recovery of consciousness due to propofol, and more recently ketamine. We show how these dynamics change systematically with different anesthetic classes and with age. As a consequence, we have developed a principled, neuroscience-based paradigm for using the EEG to monitor the brain states of patients receiving general anesthesia. We demonstrate that the state of general anesthesia can be rapidly reversed by activating specific brain circuits. Finally, we demonstrate that the state of general anesthesia can be controlled using closed-loop feedback control systems. The success of our research has depended critically on tight coupling of experiments, signal processing research and mathematical modeling."
23 Jan

Probing the Heart of Matter with Supercomputers

23 January 2024 - 4:00 PM
1200 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
Michigan State University

Huey-Wen Lin

Show/Hide Abstract
Nucleons are the building blocks of all ordinary matter, and the study of nucleon structure is a critical part of frontier research to unveil the mysteries of the universe and our existence. Gluons and quarks are the underlying degrees of freedom that explain the properties of nucleons, and fully understanding how they contribute to the properties of nucleons (such as mass or spin structure) helps to decode the last part of the Standard Model that rules our physical world. After more than half a century of large-scale experimental efforts, there are still many unknowns concerning the theory quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the branch of the Standard Model describing how gluons strongly interact with themselves and with quarks, binding both nucleons and nuclei. Using supercomputers and a theoretical tool called "lattice QCD", we can simulate the theory that dominates the universe at the femtoscale and unveil its diverse phenomenology, including some properties that are hard to determine in experiments. A few recent lattice-QCD examples and their impacts will be briefly discussed.
26 Jan

Advancing SRF Cryomodules Performance for Modern Particle Accelerators

26 January 2024 - 3:00 PM
Online via Zoom
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Donato Passarelli

Show/Hide Abstract
Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) technology plays a key role in modern particle accelerators. Starting from an overview on main accelerator types and SRF cryomodule structures, we then delve into the detailed design and development approaches employed for the PIP-II SRF LINAC, an ongoing major upgrade of the Fermilab accelerator complex. Specifically, the presentation focuses on the engineering approaches and innovative solutions that are playing a fundamental role in shaping the future of particle accelerator technology.
02 Feb

The Abundances of the Elements in Stars: 3D Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Modelling

02 February 2024 - 2:00 PM
2025 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
Uppsala University

Anish Amarsi

Show/Hide Abstract
The chemical compositions of stars place key constraints on nuclear astrophysics. The most precise way of determining these compositions is through analyses of the absorption lines in the observed star light (stellar spectroscopy). However, the accuracy of standard analyses of Sun-like stars can be limited by simplifying assumptions: in particular, that the atmosphere of the star is one-dimensional (1D), hydrostatic, and satisfies local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). In recent years it has become feasible to relax these assumptions via non-LTE post-processing of three-dimensional (3D) radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. I shall describe this approach, and then present examples where this approach has altered our understanding of the evolution of the elements in the cosmos.
06 Feb

High-Efficiency and Reliable Wide Range Operation of 2 K Helium Cryogenic Systems

06 February 2024 - 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
Michigan State University

Jonathon Howard

Show/Hide Abstract
Operation of helium cryogenic systems below the normal boiling point of helium (approximately 4.2 K) has become a common need for modern high-energy particle accelerators. Cooling near 2 K, ranging from approximately 1.8 to 2.1 K (or a saturation pressure of 16 to 40 mbar), is often required by superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) niobium resonators (also known as SRF cavities) to achieve the performance targets of the particle accelerator. To reach these temperatures, cryogenic systems evacuate, or ‘pump-down’, a liquid helium bath to sub-atmospheric pressures, thereby lowering the boiling temperature below 4.2 K. Multi-stage cryogenic centrifugal compressors (‘cold-compressors’) have been proven to be an efficient, reliable, and cost-effective method to achieve operating conditions of around 2 K for large-scale cryogenic systems. These compressors re-pressurize the sub-atmospheric helium to just above atmospheric conditions before injecting the flow back into the helium refrigerator. Although multi-stage cryogenic centrifugal compressor technology has been implemented in large-scale cryogenic systems since the late 1980’s, published research on their operation (steady-state and transient) is inadequate to provide a general characterization of the compressor performance, efficiency, and stability. The focus of this dissertation is two-fold regarding multi-stage centrifugal compressors as used for sub-atmospheric helium cryogenic systems. First, to develop a reliable performance prediction model for a multi-stage cryogenic centrifugal compressor train and validate with measurements from an actual operating system. Capabilities of the model include estimation of operational envelops that ensure stable and wide range steady-state operation. Second, to develop and validate a process model of the entire sub-atmospheric system (e.g. FRIB) being studied and establish a simple methodology to obtain a reliable thermodynamic path for the transient (‘pump-down’) process of reducing the helium bath pressure from above 1 bar to the operational steady-state conditions near 30 mbar. The effectiveness of the developed methodology is demonstrated by comparing the estimated and measured process parameters from the sub-atmospheric system studied. The developed model and methodology are intended to benefit the design and operation (both steady-state and transient) of multi-stage cryogenic centrifugal compressor used in large-scale cryogenic helium refrigeration systems.
06 Feb

A Review of the Isotopic Dichotomy of the Solar System

06 February 2024 - 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
Michigan State University

Seth Jacobson

Show/Hide Abstract
In the last decade, a startingly discovery has reshaped our understanding of solar system materials. They appear to be sorted into two distinct nucleosynthetic isotopic compositions across a large range of elements (O, Cr, Mo, Ti, Ru, Ni, etc.). One reservoir is associated with inner solar system materials including both primitive ordinary and enstatite chondrites as well as differentiated bodies such as the Moon, Mars, Earth, some iron meteorites and other achondrites. The other reservoir is associated with the carbonaceous chondrites, often believed to originate from the outer solar system (beyond Jupiter). One of the first consequences of the dichotomy was the identification of achondrites including iron meteorites that share the nucleosynthetic anomalies of the carbonaceous chondrites. The nucleosynthetic variations as measured in the Mo system appear to indicate an enrichment of r-process nuclides in the inner solar system materials relative to the outer solar system. The presence of this dichotomy has deep implications for the early history of the Solar System including a possible rapid formation of Jupiter that prevented the inward migration of r-process depleted material (i.e., spatial heterogeneity). Alternatively, thermal processing of pre-solar grains could have created an r-process enriched inner reservoir establishing a temporal heterogeneity between early and late accreting objects. These ideas will be tested using new models of solar system formation that combine astrophysics and geochemistry.
07 Feb

Fundamental Physics in Heavy Nuclei: The Role of Nuclear-Structure Theory

07 February 2024 - 4:10 PM
1300 FRIB Laboratory
University of North Carolina

Jonathan Engel

Show/Hide Abstract
Low energy experiments play an increasingly large role in the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Many experiments in that area involve heavy nuclei, where an understanding of nuclear structure at the level needed to interpret results is both crucial and hard to come by. After describing the fundamental physics we seek to better understand, I examine recent theoretical work on two sets of nuclear matrix elements --- those important for experiments on neutrinoless double-beta and on atomic electric dipole moments --- and discuss projects that may lead to major improvements in the matrix elements in the next few years.
09 Feb

Beam-Beam Effects in Future Electron-Ion Collider

09 February 2024 - 3:00 PM
Online via Zoom
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Yun Luo

Show/Hide Abstract
The Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), to be constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, will collide polarized high-energy electron beams with hadron beams, achieving luminosities up to 10^34 cm^-2s^-1 in the center-mass energy range of 20-140 GeV. To attain such high luminosity, we adopt high bunch intensities for both beams, employ flat beams at the interaction point, and implement a crossing angle collision with crab cavities in both rings. Beam-beam interaction poses a significant challenge in the design of the EIC. In this talk, the speaker will first introduce the basics of beam-beam interaction in circular colliders and the ongoing Electron-Ion Collider project. The speaker will then present the optimization of beam-beam related design parameters, selected simulation results, optics and machine imperfections, and the impacts of noises on beam-beam performances.
14 Feb

On the Importance of Complementary Observables:
Proton Cross-Shell Excitations in Neutron-Deficient Calcium Isotopes

14 February 2024 - 4:10 PM
1300 FRIB Laboratory
FRIB

Tobias Beck

Show/Hide Abstract
The neutron-deficient calcium isotopes have attracted considerable attention recently. Present studies are divided over the amount of proton pf-shell occupancy, ranging from an intact Z=20 shell closure to a considerable weakening already in the vicinity of doubly-magic 40Ca. Coulomb excitation of 36,38Ca and two-neutron removal from 38Ca populating states of 36Ca were performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The results yield conclusive evidence for the need of sizable proton cross-shell excitations already for the ground state of 36Ca. These findings furthermore enable a close reproduction of additional observables. Ultimately, the magnitude of proton cross-shell excitations is explored by means of a schematic modification of the sd-pf shell gap.
15 Feb

High-Efficiency and Reliable Wide Range Operation of 2 K Helium Cryogenic Systems

15 February 2024 - 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
Michigan State University

Jonathon Howard

Show/Hide Abstract
Operation of helium cryogenic systems below the normal boiling point of helium (approximately 4.2 K) has become a common need for modern high-energy particle accelerators. Cooling near 2 K, ranging from approximately 1.8 to 2.1 K (or a saturation pressure of 16 to 40 mbar), is often required by superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) niobium resonators (also known as SRF cavities) to achieve the performance targets of the particle accelerator. To reach these temperatures, cryogenic systems evacuate, or pump-down a liquid helium bath to sub-atmospheric pressures, thereby lowering the boiling temperature below 4.2 K. Multi-stage cryogenic centrifugal compressors (cold-compressor) have been proven to be an efficient, reliable, and cost-effective method to achieve operating conditions of around 2 K for large-scale cryogenic systems. These compressors re-pressurize the sub-atmospheric helium to just above atmospheric conditions before injecting the flow back into the helium refrigerator. Although multi-stage cryogenic centrifugal compressor technology has been implemented in large-scale cryogenic systems since the late 1980s, published research on their operation (steady-state and transient) is inadequate to provide a general characterization of the compressor performance, efficiency, and stability. The focus of this dissertation is two-fold regarding multi-stage centrifugal compressors as used for sub-atmospheric helium cryogenic systems. First, to develop a reliable performance prediction model for a multi-stage cryogenic centrifugal compressor train and validate with measurements from an actual operating system. Capabilities of the model include estimation of operational envelops that ensure stable and wide range steady-state operation. Second, to develop and validate a process model of the entire sub-atmospheric system (e.g. FRIB) being studied and establish a simple methodology to obtain a reliable thermodynamic path for the transient (pump-down) process of reducing the helium bath pressure from above 1 bar to the operational steady-state conditions near 30 mbar. The effectiveness of the developed methodology is demonstrated by comparing the estimated and measured process parameters from the sub-atmospheric system studied. The developed model and methodology are intended to benefit the design and operation (both steady-state and transient) of multi-stage cryogenic centrifugal compressor used in large-scale cryogenic helium refrigeration systems.
20 Feb

Fusion Reaction in Collisions of Weakly Bound Nuclei with Heavy Targets

20 February 2024 - 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
Facultdade de Tecnologia Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro

Jeannie Rangel

Show/Hide Abstract
Collisions of weakly bound projectiles have attracted great interest over the last few decades. The low breakup threshold of the projectile plays an important role in the reaction dynamics, affecting strongly the fusion channel. Besides the ordinary fusion process, where the whole projectile fuses with the target (CF), there is the so-called incomplete fusion (ICF) which one fragment is captured while the other survives the collision. Most experiments can only determine the total fusion cross section (TF), which is the sum of the cross sections for the CF and ICF processes. To make predictions for the CF and ICF cross-sections is also a great challenge to theorists, and several attempts have been made. Many of them are based on classical or semiclassical methods, which cannot properly handle important quantum mechanical effects. This problem is avoided in some quantum mechanical models based on the continuum discretized coupled channel (CDCC) method. However, some of them can only determine the TF cross-section, some can give individual CF and ICF cross-sections but are not valid when the projectile breaks up into fragments of comparable masses. There is also a method that provides the CF cross-section but cannot determine ICF. In this seminar, I will present a new quantum mechanical method to evaluate individual CF and ICF cross-sections. This method can be used for any weakly bound projectile and, in addition, it distinguishes the direct and sequential contributions to the CF cross-section. A few applications will be presented.
22 Feb

Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counters (PPACs) for Heavy-Ion Beam Tracking: History and Mysteries

22 February 2024 - 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
FRIB Michigan State University

Salvatore Di Carlo

Show/Hide Abstract
Despite being an old detector concept, position-sensitive Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counters (PPACs) remain widely used today for heavy-ion position and timing measurements. In modern rare isotope beam facilities and large-acceptance fragment separators, PPACs are used to characterize beam properties (diagnostics), facilitate beam delivery (tuning), and provide event-by-event beam tracking for particle identification (PID). Most popular particle localization methods in PPAC detectors are based on strip electrodes electrically connected to resistive-chain circuits or delay-lines. More exotic systems include optical readouts based on recording electroluminescence light with high-granularity photodetector arrays, or high-resolution resistive anode electrodes. PPACs with conventional resistive-chain or delay-line readouts achieve typical position and time resolutions of below 1 mm (σ) and around 150 ps (σ) respectively. In addition, delay-line systems are capable of counting rates above several hundred kHz for beam areas of a few millimeters square, and around 1 MHz for larger beam sizes. Resistive-chain readouts have limited rates of a few tens of kHz. A review of the operation principles and performance of PPAC detectors is presented in this paper. We will discuss decades-long experience building and operating PPACs developed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), and then refined at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), mostly focusing on the delay-line readout technique (DLPPAC). We will also discuss problems that arise due to electric discharges at high rates, and briefly describe ongoing developments at FRIB.
23 Feb

Electron Synchrotron for Electron Ion Collider

23 February 2024 - 3:00 PM
Online via Zoom
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Vahid H. Ranjbar

Show/Hide Abstract
"Two new Electron Synchrotron's will be built for the Electron Ion Collider (EIC). These include the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) which is used for injection into the Electron Storage Ring (ESR). Both machines will transport and store polarized electrons at energies as high as 18 GeV and be built in the existing RHIC tunnel. We will review the physic requirements and novel design of these machines, focusing on the RCS."
29 Feb

Ion Accelerator Applications, Compact RF Linear Architectures and Machine Learning for Real Time Tuning and Optimization

29 February 2024 - 4:00 PM
1221A and 1221B FRIB Laboratory
FRIB Graduate Research Assistant

Nicholas Anthony Valverde

Show/Hide Abstract
Committee: Steven Lund (Chairperson), Yue Hao Dean Lee, Steven Lidia, Chong-Yu Ruan. Thesis is available at https://pa.msu.edu/graduate-program/current-graduate-students/draft-dissertations-for-review.aspx - select student
01 Mar

Measurement of the Uranium-235(n,f) Cross Section Relative to n-p Scattering Up to 500 MeV at the Neutron Time-of-Flight Facility at CERN

01 March 2024 - 2:00 PM
2025 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
CERN

Alice Manna

Show/Hide Abstract
Neutron-induced fission reactions play a key role in the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements. The description of fission recycling during r-process nucleosynthesis, relies on model predictions of fission reactions. To this end, various models are used in literature for calculating the fission rates and the mass distribution of fission fragments for a number of heavy and highly unstable actinides. In order to provide a reliable description of reaction rates for Th, U and heavier actinides, current efforts are underway for refining models with a comprehensive and self-consistent description of the fission process. In this respect, new fission data on a variety of actinides are needed, as the predictive power of current models can only by improved by comparison with a large set of experimental results. The 235U(n,f) cross section is one of the most important neutron cross-section standards, and therefore it is recognized as a convenient reference for other reaction cross-section measurements at thermal energy and between 0.15 MeV and 200 MeV. Outside these energy ranges the cross section is either not so well known or not measured yet, as for example above 200 MeV, where evaluations can only rely on theoretical calculations. With the continuous effort for the improvement of standard cross sections by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) together with nuclear data evaluators teams, the longstanding quest for accurate and reliable 235U(n,f) cross section data turns out to be still pending, for neutron energies above 20 MeV (only 2 data sets are present in the 20-200 MeV energy region). In particular, fission measurements relative to the neutron-proton elastic scattering, which is considered the primary reference for neutron cross section measurements, are still highly requested. The neutron time-of-flight facility, n_TOF, at CERN, offers the possibility to study neutron-induced reactions thanks to the extremely wide neutron energy spectrum available in its experimental area, from thermal up to 1 GeV. In the recent years, dedicated measurement campaigns were carried out to provide accurate and precise cross section data of the 235U(n,f) reaction, in a low energy region, up to 10 MeV, as well as in the high energy region from 10 MeV to 500 MeV. The experimental apparatus used in the measurements at high neutron energies, which involved the efforts of several research institutions (INFN, PTB and IPN, in addition to CERN), consisted of three flux and two fission detectors, allowing to simultaneously record the number of neutrons impinging on the 235U samples (incident neutron flux), as well as fission events, as a function of the neutron energy. The neutron flux measurement is based on the neutron-proton elastic scattering reaction, and it exploits the detection of the recoil protons from the n-p reaction in a polyethylene target using three Proton Recoil Telescopes. The fission events have been recorded with a fission ionization chamber, as well as by a parallel plates avalanche counters (PPAC) detector, specifically designed for operation at n_TOF. The experimental apparatus and data analysis will be presented, with a focus on the results obtained in the high-energy region, above 200 MeV. A comparison with current model descriptions of the fission process at high neutron energies will be included in the comparison with the experimental results obtained at n_TOF.
07 Mar

Ab Initio Description of Monopole Resonances in Light and Medium Mass Nuclei

07 March 2024 - 2:00 PM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
Technische Universitat Darmstadt

Andrea Porro

Show/Hide Abstract
Giant monopole resonances have a long-standing theoretical importance in nuclear structure. The interest resides notably in the so-called breathing mode that has been established as a standard observable to constrain the nuclear incompressibility. The Random Phase Approximation (RPA) within the frame of phenomenological Energy Density Functionals (EDF) has become the standard tool to address giant resonances and extensive studies, have been performed throughout the years. A proper study of collective excitations within the ab initio framework is, however, missing. Additionally, the ab initio many-body methods developed over the past two decades encounter limitations when it comes to dealing with excited-state properties. In this perspective, I will present the first systematic ab initio predictions of (giant) monopole resonances. Ab initio Quasiparticle-RPA (QRPA) and Projected Generator Coordinate Method (PGCM) calculations of monopole resonances are compared in light- and mid-mass closed- and open- shell nuclei. Monopole resonances represent the starting point for exploring higher multipolarities, the goal in the medium term being to establish PGCM and QRPA as complementary tools in the development of a fundamental theory of nuclear excitations.
08 Mar

Strong Hadron Cooling for the Electron-Ion Collider

08 March 2024 - 3:00 PM
Online via Zoom
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Erdong Wang

Show/Hide Abstract
The anticipated peak and average luminosity of L = 1034 cm-2s-1 at the Electron Ion Collider (EIC) can be attained with strong cooling of the hadron beam, as the emittance of the highly luminous beams is prone to rapid growth due to Intrabeam Scattering and other diffusion mechanisms. A novel cooling method, coherent electron cooling (CeC), has been considered as the baseline strong hadron cooling approach. CeC involves utilizing an electron beam to detect the positions of protons within the bunch and then applying energy kicks to reduce their longitudinal and transverse actions.

In this presentation, we will first introduce the heating mechanism and provide an overview of the basic principles of hadron cooling. Subsequently, we will delve into the underlying physics of the CeC process. We will then discuss the current progress in design. Finally, we will discuss the challenges encountered and outline mitigation strategies, emphasizing the importance of a high-quality electron beam, high current energy recovery Linac, and the precise sub-micron alignment of electrons and protons.
08 Mar

Three Beethoven Piano Sonatas, Op. 14 and 22

08 March 2024 - 5:30 PM
1300 FRIB Laboratory

Young Hyun Cho

Show/Hide Abstract
Young Hyun Cho: Three Beethoven Piano Sonatas, Op. 14 and 22 Young Hyun Cho's concert activities have taken her around the globe. She has performed as a soloist at venues such as the Great Hall (Golden Hall) of the Vienna Musikverein, Berlin Philharmonic Concert Hall, Smetana Hall in Prague, and Solti Hall of the Liszt Academy in Budapest. As a featured soloist, she has performed with the Berlin Symphony Orchestra, Euro Sinfonietta Wien, Filarmonica della Calabria of Italy, North Czech Philharmonic Orchestra Teplice, Korean Broadcasting System Symphony Orchestra, Korean Symphony Orchestra, and numerous other orchestras. She has also performed chamber concerts and solo recitals throughout North America, Asia, and Europe. She released her CD with the Last Three Beethoven Piano Sonatas under the Sony label. She received her Doctoral Arts of Musical degree from the Eastman School of Music, Master's degree and Graduate Performance Diploma from Peabody Conservatory, and Bachelor's degree from Seoul National University. Her primary teachers include Nelita True, Boris Slutsky and Mikyung Kim. Young Hyun Cho is currently an associate professor of piano at the Michigan State University College of Music and previously was a faculty member at the University of Texas at Arlington. Sonata No. 9 in E major, Op. 14, No. 1 Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) Allegro Allegretto Rondo: Allegro comodo Sonata No. 10 in G major, Op. 14, No. 2 Allegro Andante Scherzo: Allegro assai Sonata No. 11 in B-flat major, Op. 22 Allegro con brio Adagio con molta espressione Minuetto Rondo: Allegretto
13 Mar

Measurement of the Isolated Nuclear Two-Photon Decay

13 March 2024 - 4:10 PM
1300 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
IRFU, CEA, Universite Paris-Saclay

Wolfram Korten

Show/Hide Abstract

The nuclear two-photon or double-gamma (2y) decay is a second-order electromagnetic decay process whereby a nucleus in an excited state emits two gamma rays simultaneously. Compared to first-order decay pathways, such as single photon emission or internal conversion, the two-photon decay rate is very small. Ideal cases for this search are 0+ → 0+ transitions, where single photon emission is prohibited. However, the only cases where the 2y decay of a was successfully observed using γ-ray spectroscopy are 16O, 40Ca and 90Zr [1, 2], where the high energy of the transitions is favorable for the 2y branch. At lower energies the 2y branch becomes prohibitively small for y-ray spectroscopy (10-6-7). We have therefore combined the isochronous mode of a storage ring with Schottky resonant cavities to perform Schottky + Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (S+IMS) in order to study exotic decays of short-lived states at the Experimental Storage Ring at GSI. This novel technique allowed us to conduct the first measurement of the half-life for the isolated nuclear two-photon decay of the 0+ isomer in 72Ge [3]. The obtained mass resolving power enables future experiments on nuclear isomers with excitation energies down to ~100 keV and half-lives as short as ~10 ms.

15 Mar

The Other Side of Physics: Understanding, Awareness, and Support of Mental Health

15 March 2024 - 2:00 PM
2025 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
Michigan State University

Rachel Younger

Show/Hide Abstract
As mental health initiatives are gaining momentum, aspects of mental health remain misunderstood and stigmatized. This presentation aims to provide understanding of the various mental health disorders that commonly impact individuals in STEM fields, their manifestations, factors that impact mental health, and strategies to support mental health wellbeing. Key topics to be discussed will also include intersectionality of mental health with other aspects of identity, and the importance of early intervention and support networks. This presentation aims to empower through knowledge, awareness, and strategies that support mental health wellbeing, encouraging a supportive and understanding community environment.
15 Mar

International Chamber Soloists

15 March 2024 - 6:00 PM
1300 FRIB Laboratory
Michigan State University, College of Music

Dmitri Berlinsky

18 Mar

Measuring the Oxygen-15(a, y) Neon-19 Reaction in Type I X-ray Bursts Using 20Mg B-decay

18 March 2024 - 3:00 PM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
FRIB Graduate Research Assistant

Tyler M. Wheeler

Show/Hide Abstract
Committee: Christopher Wrede (Physics Advisor), Saiprasad Ravishanker (CMSE Advisor), Edward Brown Paul Gueye, Darren Grant. Thesis is available at https://pa.msu.edu/graduate-program/current-graduate-students/draft-dissertations-for-review.aspx - select student
19 Mar

An Adiabatic Hyperspherical Approach to Few-Body Systems in the Nuclear Sector

19 March 2024 - 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
Purdue University

Michael Higgins

Show/Hide Abstract
An area of the few-body sector that provides a natural class of systems near the unitarity limit is low-energy nuclear physics. These systems include halo nuclei, which are good candidate systems to study the near-unitarity limit and universality. Two-neutron halos have been extensively studied, such as 6He, 9B, 11Li, 12Be, and 12C. With the large neutron-neutron (nn) 1S0 scattering length (as~-18.5 fm), halo nuclei are good candidates to study universal physics near the unitarity limit and the possible emergence of Efimov physics in Borromean systems or the scattering continuum. In this work, we use the adiabatic hyperspherical representation to study halo nuclei consisting of four neutrons. The adiabatic hyperspherical representation has been extensively applied to few-body systems, in which a description of all possible reaction pathways is treated on an equal footing from treating a collective coordinate, the hyperradius, adiabatically. I will present currently ongoing work that focuses on the 4He+2n , 4He+3n , and 4He+4n systems. In particular, the 4He+4n system has been of recent theoretical interest sparked by the 2022 experiment by Duer et. al. that found a low-energy 4n signal in the missing mass spectrum of the 8He(p,p4He)4n reaction. This work aims to provide theoretical insight into the qualitative and quantitative nature of the five-body scattering continuum and possible universal physics arising in four-neutron halos from the nn interaction. I will further present our previous work on the four-neutron system
20 Mar

The Spin on Angular Momentum in Fission

20 March 2024 - 4:10 PM
1300 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Ramona Vogt

Show/Hide Abstract

Fission studies have undergone a renaissance in the last decade or so. Much of the new work, both
experimental and theoretical, has focused on correlated observables. To address these types of observables,
fission models that can treat complete fission events are needed. (One cannot look at fission as a black
box generating independent neutron and photon emission.) Simulation codes have been developed to
generate complete fission events. One of these codes is the fission model FREYA which is very well
suited for studying fission because it can quickly and easily generate fission events and reveal observational
consequences. For example, the role of angular momentum in fission has been the subject of intense recent
attention. Data published in Nature suggested that fission fragment spins were largely uncorrelated, while
one might instead expect that the fragment spins are highly correlated. This talk will introduce FREYA
and some of its applications to fission studies, with an emphasis on its treatment of angular momentum.
†This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

20 Mar

Does Nuclear Arms Control with Russia and China Have a Future?

20 March 2024 - 5:00 PM
1300 FRIB Laboratory
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

George Perkovich

Show/Hide Abstract
Distinguished Nuclear Policy Lecture Series:

Nuclear arms control for the foreseeable future will be hindered by polarized politics that impact compromise with foreign adversaries and internal opponents, and by the emergence of new technologies and multi-party rather than bilateral strategic contests. This presentation will explore how these processes confound military planners, political leaders, and diplomatic negotiators in each country who would have to figure out what sorts of arms control bargains are desirable and acceptable. History suggests ways to overcome these obstacles, but the pathways to be navigated today are more challenging.

22 Mar

Tentative Thesis Title: Investigating Neutron-Rich Pre-Fragment Distributions in Projectile Fragmentation Reactions

22 March 2024 - 1:00 PM
1200 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
FRIB Graduate Research Assistant

Georgia Votta

Show/Hide Abstract
Committee: Paul Gueye (Chairperson), Chloe Hebborn Rachel Henderson, Kendall Mahn, Michael Thoennessen
22 Mar

SRF Cavities Resonance Control

22 March 2024 - 3:00 PM
Online via Zoom
Fermilab

Yuriy Pischalnikov

Show/Hide Abstract
SRF cavities, that are central elements of the modern accelerator complexes, required accurate frequency control, which is achieved using cavity tuners. Review of the sources of the SRF cavity detuning and brief discussion of the mitigation techniques will be presented. Talk will summarize the result of 20 years of international activities into development of different types of SRF cavity tuners. The solutions of the many technical problems to deliver tuners that could reliably operate for 30+ years (lifetime of the accelerator) will be discussed.
22 Mar

Electronic Music Workshop: Explorations in Improvisation

22 March 2024 - 5:30 PM
1300 FRIB Laboratory
Show/Hide Abstract

Electronic Music Workshop (EMW) is an eclectic ensemble that features a rotating instrumentation and combination of acoustic and electronic instruments. EMW is an improvisation-based ensemble, often co-composing pieces as a group based on their collective interests. EMW also interprets poetry or visual art through music and performs non-traditional scores written by contemporary composers. EMW seeks to foster communication, creativity, and confidence through exploring experimental means of music-making.

23 Mar

Artist Talk & Reception

23 March 2024 - 2:00 PM
1300 FRIB Laboratory
Studio Korinsky

Abel Korinsky

Show/Hide Abstract
Meet the inaugural MSUFCU Arts Power Up Artist-in-Residence Abel Korinsky, of the Berlin-based Studio Korinsky. Over the next few months, Korinsky will be embedded in the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), one of the world's leading nuclear physics laboratories. From this experience, he will create pieces to be exhibited by the MSU Museum CoLab Studio in Fall 2024. Come hear about Korinsky's artistic philosophy, past work, and his vision for this endeavor. Register here: https://113145.blackbaudhosting.com/113145/Artist-Talk-and-Reception
27 Mar

Past, present and future vision for high-gradient linear accelerators and its applications to future high-energy physics machines, light sources, and medical instruments

27 March 2024 - 4:10 PM
101 Biochemistry Building
Stanford University

Sami Tantawi

Show/Hide Abstract
We start with an overview of the history of high-gradient linear accelerator developments that took place over the span of more than three decades to pave the way for a future collider to explore the energy frontier of high-energy physics. We then present an overview of recent advances in high-gradient linear accelerators operating at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. We will include the advances that enabled us to understand better the underlying fundamental physics that governs the breakdown phenomena in high-field vacuum structures. With this new understanding, recent advances in linac topologies, materials, and operating temperatures started to emerge. We will review these and present a vision for future energy frontier machines and future light sources. The vision for this future research and development will include the core effort on the linacs, RF sources, and other auxiliary components, with the goal of optimizing the overall system performance and cost rather than the optimization of individual components independently. These advances also promise to revolutionize many other applications in the near future, including medical radiotherapy devices. We will explore the ongoing effort on this front, especially the possibilities for realizing the so-called “flash treatment.
28 Mar

Meet and Greet FRIB Artist in Residence Abel Korinsky

28 March 2024 - 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
Studio Korinsky

Abel Korinsky

Show/Hide Abstract
Meet the inaugural MSUFCU Arts Power Up Artist-in-Residence Abel Korinsky, of the Berlin-based Studio Korinsky. Over the next few months, Korinsky will be embedded at FRIB. From this experience, he will create pieces to be exhibited by the MSU Museum CoLab Studio in fall 2024. Come hear about Korinsky's artistic philosophy, past work, and his vision for this endeavor. The MSUFCU Arts Power Up Arts Residency at FRIB program is generously supported by an endowed gift from the Michigan State University Federal Credit Union
29 Mar

Nucleosynthesis with Multi-Dimensional Supernova Simulations

29 March 2024 - 2:00 PM
2025 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
LLNL

Andre Sieverding

Show/Hide Abstract
Core-collapse supernovae, the extremely energetic explosions of stars 10 times more massive than our sun, are known to be major contributors to the synthesis of the elements in the universe. Most of our understanding of these contributions is based on parameterized, spherically symmetric models. Only recently, multi-dimensional, self-consistent simulations have been carried out. Evaluating the nucleosynthesis of such large-scale simulations poses unique challenges and opens up new questions, that will be presented here. The first studies in this area, however, also show that there is a large potential for such simulations to address some long-standing tensions between theory and observations and due to the large variability of conditions predicted by the recent simulations, accurate predictions of the compositions requires knowledge of the nuclear properties and cross-sections on both sides of beta-stability. Prepared by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344. This research was supported by the European Union's Horizon Europe Programme under Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No.101065891, and by the German Research Foundation through the Collaborative Research Centre “Neutrinos and Dark Matter in Astro-and Particle Physics (NDM)”, grant No. SFB-1258-283604770, and through the Cluster of Excellence ORIGINS (EXC2094-390783311). LLNL-ABS-858843
29 Mar

Harp Performance: Chansons de Paris

29 March 2024 - 5:30 PM
1300 FRIB Laboratory
Show/Hide Abstract

Performer Bios

Richie Diaz is a flutist from Abilene, Texas, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in music performance in flute at Hardin-Simmons University. He is currently studying at MSU to receive his master of music degree in music performance. In 2018, Diaz received the Outstanding Soloist award at the Texas State Solo and Ensemble Contest. During his time at Hardin-Simmons Diaz was a private lesson instructor for the Abilene Independent School District while also holding the co-principal spot of the Civic Orchestra of Abilene. While studying at Hardin-Simmons, Diaz has traveled and performed with the “World Famous” Cowboy Band, marching in the 2020 Mardi Gras parade in New Orleans, Louisiana, as well as the 2022 St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Dublin, Ireland. Diaz has studied under Alex Carpenter (Hardin-Simmons), Richard Sherman (MSU), and Hannah Hammel Maser (Detroit Symphony Orchestra), as well as taken lessons from Melissa Suhr (University of Houston), Kathrine Kemmler (Louisiana State University), and Terri Sundberg (University of North Texas).

Astrophysicist and harpist Katelynn Ehlert is originally from Sturgis, Michigan, and is currently a fifth-year undergraduate student at MSU. She us pursuing her bachelor or art degree in music and bachelor of science degree in astrophysics. Ehlert is currently working as a research assistant at MSU for the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, where she works towards furthering the study of neutrinos. Prior to this, she spent two years working on the ATLAS upgrade for CERN at MSU. Ehlert is also an active advocate for women and minorities in STEM as has served as the president of the MSU chapter of the Society of Women in Space Exploration for the last four years. An experienced orchestral and solo musician, Ehlert has had the opportunity to work with the Symphony of the Lakes, the Lansing Symphony Orchestra, the Livington Symphony Orchestra, and various MSU ensembles. She was also the a finalist for the MASTA Elizabeth E.H. Green Solo Competition in 2023. Ehlert also has experience as a music educator. She is currently an instructor for the Capitol Harp Ensemble, and has been the instructor at the Sturgis High School Orchestra Camp for five years. On top of this, she is currently the vice president of the West Michigan Harp Chapter. Throughout her 12 years as a harpist, Ehlert has studied with many accomplished members of the harp community, includinjg Chen-Yu Huang, Elzbieta Szmyt, Jan Jennings, Molly Grettenberger, and Stephanie Gustafson. Ehlert is currently furthering her studies at MSU with Cheryl-Losey Feder as her primary educator.

Canadian violist Meagan Turner is in demand throughout North America and Australia. Turner has served as principal violist of the New York String Orchestra Seminar, Spoleto Festival Orchestra, Tanglewood Music Centre Orchestra, and Juilliard Orchestras, and regularly performs with the Australian Chamber Orchestra. An active chamber musician, she has attended the Ravinia Steans Music Institute and has been a guest artist at Tippet Rise, the Mackay Chamber Music Festival, and guest principal violist with Sydney’s Omega Ensemble. Turner is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Rachel Elizabeth Barton Pine and Virtu Foundation career grants, and was recently named one of Canada’s “Hottest Musicians Under 30” by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). From 2018-2020, she held a young artists’ residency at Carnegie Hall. Turner completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Toronto and her master’s degree at The Juilliard School as a full scholarship student. She is currently pursuing a doctor of musical arts degree with Eric Nowlin at MSU.

01 Apr

Beyond Rare Connections

01 April 2024 - 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
FRIB/Michigan State University

Agnes Mocsy

Show/Hide Abstract
Ágnes Mócsy will give a ten-minute presentation at the beginning, providing her thoughts on projects she is interested in pursuing at FRIB after the completion of the Rare Connections film. After the presentation, there will be an informal discussion where people can share their ideas on how this opportunity can be useful for enhancing diversity, broadening participation, informal science education, student recruitment, highlighting nuclear science to the public, and building bridges between art and science
04 Apr

Studying Fission Properties Near 198Pb with AT-TPC at FRIB

04 April 2024 - 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
FRIB Michigan State University

Curtis Hunt

Show/Hide Abstract
Since the discovery of the fission, fission decays has been measured for actinide nuclei and for compound nuclei formed in collisions of long-lived projectile and target nuclei. Expanding such studies to include collisions of rare isotope beams with stable targets allows fission studies to be extended to new regions of the nuclear chart. Recent measurements with rare isotope beams have revealed an unexpected island of asymmetric fission in the region of the neutron deficient pre-actinides, around 180Hg through 198Pb. The fission properties for isotopes in this region have been calculated, suggesting that asymmetric fission may be more common than expected, but experimental information is sparse. We have developed a new method to study the fission barrier and mass asymmetry using the Active Target Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC). I will discuss results from an initial study that looked at the rare isotopes along the transition from symmetric to asymmetric fission near 198Pb. These rare isotopes were produced by fusing rare isotopes separated by the A1900 separator at the NSCL with 4He target nuclei in the AT-TPC. The rare isotope beam particles were isotopically identified with the new Heavy Isotope Tagger (HEIST), allowing for the identification of the fissioning nucleus on an event-by-event basis. A combination of traditional and machine learning methods has been utilized to identify fission events and the excitation energy of the compound nucleus has been determined by studying the energy loss of the fission products in the AT-TPC. I will present preliminary cross sections and fission barriers that have been found for some Astatine isotope. Prospects for future fission experiments at FRIB with the AT-TPC will also be discussed.
05 Apr

Solid-phase Isotope Harvesting: Harvesting Radioisotopes from Beam Irradiated Tungsten, Boron and Lutetium

05 April 2024 - 2:00 PM
1200 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
FRIB Graduate Research Assistant

Samridhi Satija

05 Apr

Hadron Storage Ring of Electron-Ion Collider

05 April 2024 - 3:00 PM
Online via Zoom
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Vadim Pittsyn

Show/Hide Abstract
The Electron Ion Collider (EIC) is a new collider that will carry out experiments to study in great detail the structure of nucleons and nuclei, as well as the role of gluons in the matter around us. The collider is presently in the design and early construction stages at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. One of the major components of the EIC is the Hadron Storage Ring (HSR), which will provide for collisions in a wide energy range beams of different species, from protons to heavy ions. A large part of the experimental program of the EIC requires polarized beams; thus, the HSR will be capable of providing highly polarized beams of protons and helions. The HSR will reuse most of the existing hardware from the RHIC accelerator ring; however, extensive modifications will have to be performed to prepare for the new accelerator parameters and performance required by the EIC. This includes upgrades of the beam vacuum chamber, beam instrumentation, RF system, and the injection system. A hadron cooler must be constructed to create the hadron beam quality required for high luminosity experiments. We will overview the main design features of the HSR, as well as the most important upgrades required to transform RHIC into the EIC HSR.
09 Apr

Resonance Compensation Studies at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Recycler Ring

09 April 2024 - 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
FRIB Graduate Research Assistant

Cristhian Gonzalez-Ortiz

Show/Hide Abstract
Committee: Peter Ostroumov (Chairperson), Paul Gueye, Yue Hao, Steven Lund, Kendall Mahn Thesis is available at https://pa.msu.edu/academics/graduate-program/current-graduate-students/draft-dissertations-for-review/ - Select student name
09 Apr

Beam Diagnostics of the J-PARC Accelerator and Its Applications

09 April 2024 - 4:00 PM
1200 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK)

Takeshi Toyama

Show/Hide Abstract

At first overview of the project status and future plans of J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) will be given.

Next beam diagnostic instruments of the J-PARC accelerators will be reviewed.
The talk will focus on measurements of high-intensity H-minus beams and proton beams, discussing our experience of "non-invasive" diagnostics.

Application to the machine protection system (MPS) will be shown how the MPS has been progressing by responding actual incidents caused by increasing beam intensity.

10 Apr

Tentative Thesis Title: Uncertainty Quantification in Few-Body Reaction Theory

10 April 2024 - 9:30 AM
1300 FRIB Laboratory
FRIB Graduate Research Assistant

Manuel Catacora-Rios

Show/Hide Abstract
Committee: Filomena Nunes (Chairperson), Chloe Hebborn, Carlo Piermarocchi, Willie WY Wong, Remco Zegers
10 Apr

New Methodology for Probing Halo Structure in Excited States

10 April 2024 - 10:30 AM
1300 FRIB Laboratory
FRIB Graduate Research Assistant

Andrew Douglas

Show/Hide Abstract
Committee: Hironori Iwasaki (Chairperson), Sophie Berkman, Alyssa Gaiser, Chloë Hebborn, Artemis Spyrou
10 Apr

New Quantum Algorithms and Analyses for Hamiltonian Simulation

10 April 2024 - 3:00 PM
1400 Biomedical and Physical Sciences Building and Online via Zoom
FRIB Graduate Research Assistant

Jacob Watkins

Show/Hide Abstract
Committee: Dean Lee (Chairperson), Morten Hjorth-Jensen, Ryan LaRose, Mohammad Maghrebi, Johannes Pollanen Thesis is available at https://pa.msu.edu/graduate-program/current-graduate-students/draft-dissertations-for-review.aspx - Select student name
10 Apr

Nuclear Data to Quantify Urca Cooling in Accreting Neutron Stars

10 April 2024 - 9:00 PM
1200 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
FRIB Graduate Research Assistant

Rahul Jain

Show/Hide Abstract
Committee: Hendrik Schatz (Chairperson), Edward Brown, Michael Murillo, Witold Nazarewicz,Artemis Spyrou Thesis is available at https://pa.msu.edu/graduate-program/current-graduate-students/draft-dissertations-for-review.aspx - Select student name
11 Apr

Scalable Readout System for multiple detector applications

11 April 2024 - 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
CERN

Alexander Rusu

Show/Hide Abstract
The SRS developed and introduced in 2009 by RD51 collaboration is a common effort inside the community members. The system was designed to be versatile and to have a multi purpose approach such that one can use multiple Front End ASICs for various detectors. The initial detector application were GEMs and Micromegas and the first ASIC used for the system was the APV25 a multiple channel preamplifier but after some time an upgrade for higher rates was required and the system migrated towards the VMM ASIC developed for the ATLAS New Small Wheel detector. After several iterations and intensive R and D work the final and reliable version of VMM 128 Channel Hybrid V5.2 was ready for the user community. SRS Technology the CERN Spin Off successfully implemented production lines for the SRS hardware and is constantly involved in the support of the research groups and in the new SRS related upgrades. One SRS FEC ( Front End Concentrator ) consists of 1024 channels input from the VMM Hybrids and starting from 2023 new FECs are under development for 256 or 2048 channels extending the flexibility and creating also compactness crate less hardware for easier usage set-up. The new FECs will have possibility for new ASICs integration such as HGCROC and Timepix. The ALICE Collaboration is building for Run 4 at LHC a Forward Calorimeter and the VMM SRS successfully took part in the test beam readout campaign of the Hadronic Calorimeter that is SIPM based of Focal H.
11 Apr

Intersection Conversation: Stellar Connections between Art and Science

11 April 2024 - 5:30 PM
1300 FRIB Laboratory
Studio Korinsky

Abel Korinsky

Show/Hide Abstract
Join us for an exciting discussion between Abel Korinsky, the inaugural MSUFCU Arts Power Up Artist-in-Residence, and Hendrik Schatz, MSU University Distinguished Professor of Nuclear Astrophysics and scientist at FRIB. They'll explore the fascinating intersection of artistic expression and scientific discovery. Register for the talk here: https://113145.blackbaudhosting.com/113145/Stellar-Connections-Between-Art-and-Science A hands-on workshop led by artist Abel Korinsky will follow the conversation to continue to explore this topic. This portion take place at Rm 1309. Register for the workshop here: https://113145.blackbaudhosting.com/113145/Stellar-Connections-Hands-On-Workshop
12 Apr

First Light And Reionisation Epoch

12 April 2024 - 2:00 PM
2025 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
University of Sussex

Aswin Vijayan

Show/Hide Abstract
In this talk I will walk you through some of the open questions in the galaxy formation and evolution in the first billion years, which can be roughly termed the First Light And Reionisation Epoch. I will discuss how simulations of galaxy formation and evolution are a great avenue to interpret the current observational data. In particular I will focus on a suite of simulations that I work with, termed the First Light And Reionisation Epoch Simulations (FLARES), that have been designed to produce a statistical sample of high-redshift galaxies, that will be accessible to current and next generation telescopes like Euclid, JWST or Roman. I will talk about how we forward model our simulated galaxies into the observed space allowing us to work as close as possible to the observations. I will briefly talk about the successes and drawbacks of the simulation with respect to the latest data from JWST. I will then shift my focus on how the presence of dust complicates the interpretation of emission line spectra that are used to understand the nature of the ISM in these high-redshift systems, now accessible due to JWST.
12 Apr

Voice and Piano Concert

12 April 2024 - 5:30 PM
1300 FRIB Laboratory
Show/Hide Abstract

Program

from Mörike-Lieder - Hugo Wolf (1860-1903)
-Er ist's   

from Lieder-Album für die Jugend - Robert Schumann (1810-1856)
-Er ist’s

Die Forelle, Opus 32 - Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

from La Rondine - Giacomo Puccini (1858-1924)
-“Chi il bel sogno”  

from Don Giovanni - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
-“Dalla sua pace”

from Hermit Songs, Opus 29 - Samuel Barber (1910-1981)
-At St. Patrick’s Purgatory
-St. Ita’s Vision
-The Crucifixion
-Promiscuity
-The Monk and His Cat
-The Desire for Hermitage

from 7 Elizabethan Songs, Opus 12 - Roger Quilter (1877-1953)

Weep No More  
My Life’s Delight
Fair House of Joy

Minicabs - William Bolcom (b. 1938)

I Feel Good About Something     
People Change
Those
Food Song #1
Food Song #2
I Will Never Forgive You
Songette
Not Even a Haiku
Maxim #1
Maxim #2
Anyone
Finale: Mystery of the Song?

from Music Box Revue  - Irving Berlin (1888-1989)
What'll I Do?        

from The Fantasticks - Harvey Schmidt (1929-2018)
Soon It’s Gonna Rain

Performer Bios

 

Mira Choi is currently a doctor of musical arts student in collaborative piano at MSU, studying with Zhihua Tang. She holds a master's degree from MSU under Zhihua Tang, a master’s degree from Sungshin Women’s University in Korea under Jinhye Lee and Gyeongju Jang, and a bachelor’s degree from Kyungnam University in Korea, studying with Soohyun Cho. Serving as a collaborative pianist at MSU, Mira plays for the MSU Opera under Professor Helton, showcasing her talent in productions like Mozart's La finta giardiniera, Don Giovanni, Verdi's Falstaff, and Sondheim's A Little Night Music. She also provides accompaniment for the Singing Spartans (the former MSU Men’s Glee Choir), directed by Dr. Reed, and supports vocal students in Professor Fracker's studio. Her participation in numerous master classes, including those led by Helmut Deutsch and Cameron Stowe, highlights her commitment to continual learning and growth. Mira's accompaniment repertoire extends to various music classes, instrumental and vocal recitals, and ensemble performances within MSU. Her previous engagements include facilitating master classes at the Centro Studi Carlo Della Giacoma in Todi, Italy, collaborating with Viridis (the former MSU Women's Glee Choir), and participating at the Interlochen Arts Summer Camp. Currently, she serves as the choir pianist at the First Presbyterian Church in Holt, continuing her dedicated involvement in both educational and community music settings.

 

Cole Harvey is a tenor currently pursuing his master’s degree in vocal performance from MSU. He will return next semester to begin his doctor of musical arts degree at MSU in vocal performance. Cole has sung many roles for MSU Opera Theater, including Albert in Albert. He was also selected as one of 32 emerging artists to participate in this summer’s Seagle Young Artist Festival, featuring young artists from around the country. Cole will cover the role of Don Ottavio in Don Giovanni, as well as play Pireli in Sweeney Todd.

Paige Heidrich, a soprano, is an Ohio native currently pursuing a doctor of musical arts degree in voice performance at MSU. She received a master’s of music degree in voice performance at MSU as well as undergraduate degrees in voice performance and music education from Baldwin Wallace University’s Conservatory of Music. After working mostly in musical theater summer stock, Paige went on to sing the roles of Pamina in The Magic Flute and Constance in Dialogues of the Carmelites with Resonanz Opera after her undergraduate work. She has also been seen on the MSU mainstage as Alice Ford in Falstaff, Lady Billows in Albert Herring, and Geraldine in A Hand of Bridge. As a soloist, Paige has debuted chamber works by composers Lincoln Sandham and Jeremy Makkonen. She has also been a featured soloist with the MSU Chorale, the BW Treble Choir, and the Ashtabula Area Orchestra. As an educator, she frequently collaborates with pianist Dr. Tina Gorter to produce recitals and master classes focusing on chamber music communication. Paige currently maintains two private studios through the MSU Community Music School and the Brighton School for the Arts. This summer, she will appear in the Detroit Opera’s production of The Cunning Little Vixen, and will be working as the assistant director for the Des Moines Metro Opera’s production of The Barber of Seville.

16 Apr

From Chiral Effective Field Theory to Perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics: A Bayesian Model Mixing Approach to Symmetric Nuclear Matter

16 April 2024 - 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
Ohio University

Alexandra Semposki

Show/Hide Abstract
Constraining the equation of state (EOS) of strongly interacting, dense matter is the focus of intense experimental, observational, and theoretical effort. Chiral effective field theory (ChEFT) can describe the EOS at densities up to twice nuclear saturation density (n0), while perturbative QCD (pQCD) can be applied to properties of deconfined quark matter. The uncertainty due to truncation of the perturbative series at a finite order can be quantified for both theories using a single methodology, developed by the BUQEYE collaboration, that I will explain in my talk. However, this still leaves uncertainty quantification for the EOS in the intermediate region between 2n0 and (20-40)n0 as an unsolved problem. To bridge this gap between ChEFT and pQCD, we employ Bayesian model mixing (BMM) techniques we are developing for the BAND collaboration’s cyberinfrastructure framework. Specifically, we combine Gaussian random variables that constitute the predictions from each theory for the pressure as a function of the density in symmetric nuclear matter. In this FRIB theory seminar, I will present results from our recent arXiv submission for the pressure and speed of sound squared of symmetric nuclear matter. These results were obtained from the application of two BMM approaches: a pointwise approach, and a correlated approach implemented via a Gaussian process (GP), the latter of which allows for inclusion of full covariance information from both theories to the model mixing. I will also discuss extensions of this work for future improvements and applications to neutron-rich matter.
17 Apr

Probing Neutron-rich Nuclei: from Level Scheme to Nuclear Radii

17 April 2024 - 4:10 PM
1300 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

Paul Gueye

Show/Hide Abstract
Starting over two decades ago, the MoNA Collaboration has now established itself as a leader in the understanding of the nuclear structure from the study of neutron unbound nuclei through (primarily) nuclear breakup or particle removal reactions. This Collaboration, comprised of eleven undergraduate institutions working with Michigan State University, started at the then National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and is now entering a new era at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams. It uses the invariant mass spectroscopy technique to reconstruct the decay energy of these neutron rich nuclei from the experimentally measured four-momenta of the decay (fragments and neutrons) products. This is performed by leveraging the Modular Neutron Array and Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (MoNA-LISA) plastic scintillator-based neutron detectors and a large gap Sweeper magnet, the latter preceding a suite of charged detector systems. This talk will highlight two experiments utilizing the MoNA-LISA-Sweeper system: the measurement of the 26O lifetime and search for excited states in 31Ne. In addition to their primary focus, the former lead to extracting further insights into 27O, thus complementing a recent measurement of this isotope at the Japanese RIKEN facility, and the latter is providing new pathways to extract information about nuclear sizes for neutron rich nuclei. These novel analyses are opening new science opportunities for the MoNA Collaboration, including bridging a gap with a recent effort to address the neutron skin puzzle through electron scattering at intermediate energies. The aforementioned also contributed strongly to expanding the reach of FRIB to broaden representation in nuclear science furthering the impact of this facility for the U.S. nuclear science workforce.
19 Apr

High-Field Superconductors and Superconducting Magnets for Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source and Frontier Nuclear Physics

19 April 2024 - 3:00 PM
1221A and 1221B FRIB Laboratory
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Tengming Shen

Show/Hide Abstract

FRIB and LBNL have been collaborating to build high-field superconducting ECR ion source (ECRIS). Out of this collaboration, the first 28 GHz all superconducting Nb-Ti based ECRIS magnet has been in operation at FRIB since 2022 and the designing and prototyping efforts in using a higher-field Nb3Sn conductor are ongoing. This talk will discuss performance, design, design and simulation tools, fabrication methods used for these magnets, and their limits. This talk will also discuss characteristics of practical high field superconductors (Nb-Ti, Nb3Sn, and high-temperature superconductors), a new MARS-ECRIS magnet concept being prototyped at LBNL, the possibility of utilizing high-temperature superconductors for building ECRIS and frontier nuclear physics.

23 Apr

Tentative Thesis Title:
Precision Mass Measurement of Proton Halo Candidate 22Al and the Development of the Single Ion Penning Trap

23 April 2024 - 2:00 PM
1200 FRIB Laboratory
FRIB Graduate Research Assistant

Scott Campbell

Show/Hide Abstract
Committee: Ryan Ringle (Chairperson), Kei Minamisono, Scott Pratt, Reinhard Schwienhorst, Hui-Chia Yu.
26 Apr

Probing Dense Matter in Neutron Stars

26 April 2024 - 10:00 AM
2025 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
Goethe University Frankfurt

Juergen Schaffner-Bielich

Show/Hide Abstract
*Please note that this seminar will take place at 10am Eastern Time Neutron Stars are born in core-collapse supernovae being the endpoint of stellar evolution of massive stars. Their extreme properties allow for the study of dense matter in the sky. In recent years the advancement of astrophysical observations has been so tremendous that the properties of neutron stars can be constrained nowadays to an unprecedented level. I will summarize the basic observations of neutron star masses from pulsar data, the constraints on radii from x-ray measurements, and the first detection of gravitational waves from a neutron star merger. On the other hand, I will discuss the nuclear and particle physics aspects of the equation of state of neutron star matter which is firmly limited at low and high energy densities. Chiral effective field theory puts a stringent constraint up to about saturation density for pure neutron matter. Perturbative QCD calculations narrow the equation of state at ultimately high densities. Finally, I will address the possible existence of new phases in the core of neutron stars which can be revealed from the mass-radius relation of neutron stars. I will argue that it is in principle impossible to rule out phase transitions in neutron stars from observations based on general relativity alone. Speaker Homepage: https://astro.uni-frankfurt.de/schaffner/
30 Apr

Quantum Algorithms for Simulating Nuclear Effective Field Theories

30 April 2024 - 11:00 AM
1200 FRIB Laboratory and Online via Zoom
University of Maryland

James Watson

Show/Hide Abstract
Quantum computers offer the potential to simulate nuclear processes that are classically intractable. With the goal of understanding the necessary quantum resources, we employ state-of-the-art Hamiltonian-simulation methods, and conduct a thorough algorithmic analysis, to estimate the qubit and gate costs to simulate low-energy effective field theories (EFTs) of nuclear physics. In particular, within the framework of nuclear lattice EFT, we obtain simulation costs for the leading-order pionless and pionful EFTs. We consider both static pions represented by a one-pion-exchange potential between the nucleons, and dynamical pions represented by relativistic bosonic fields coupled to non-relativistic nucleons. We examine the resource costs for the tasks of time evolution and energy estimation for physically relevant scales. We account for model errors associated with truncating either long-range interactions in the one-pion-exchange EFT or the pionic Hilbert space in the dynamical-pion EFT, and for algorithmic errors associated with product-formula approximations and quantum phase estimation. Our results show that the pionless EFT is the least costly to simulate and the dynamical-pion theory is the costliest. We demonstrate how symmetries of the low-energy nuclear Hamiltonians can be utilized to obtain tighter error bounds on the simulation algorithm. By retaining the locality of nucleonic interactions when mapped to qubits, we achieve reduced circuit depth and substantial parallelization. This work highlights the importance of combining physics insights and algorithmic advancement in reducing quantum-simulation costs.
09 May

STREAMLINE Symposium

09 May 2024 - 8:00 AM
1221A and 1221B FRIB Laboratory
Show/Hide Abstract
The STREAMLINE (SmarT Reduction and Emulation Applying Machine Learning In Nuclear Environments) collaboration aims to advance the frontiers of theoretical and computational research on the nuclear many-body problem using ML. The scientific problems we address are among the most challenging in computational nuclear many-body theory and the collaboration is aligned with the U.S. government initiative to build a broad-based, multidisciplinary, multi-agency program for a sustained national AI structure. STREAMLINE will advance large nuclear physics computations to dramatically increase predictive power and improve our understanding of nuclear structure and dynamics, dense nucleonic matter, and emergent many-body phenomena -- this includes the properties of heavy neutron-rich nuclei and related astrophysical environments at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB); structure and reactions of nuclei and nuclear astrophysics at the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS); neutron distributions in nuclei and few-body systems at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF); properties of fission at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE); and nuclear structure, reactions, and astrophysics at Association for Research at University Nuclear Accelerator facilities (ARUNA).
12 May

Nuclear Science Summer School

12 May 2024 - 5:00 PM
1221A and 1221B FRIB Laboratory
Show/Hide Abstract
The Nuclear Science Summer School (NS3) is a summer school that introduces undergraduate student participants to the fields of nuclear science and nuclear astrophysics. NS3 is hosted by FRIB on the campus of Michigan State University (MSU). The school will offer lectures and activities covering selected nuclear science and astrophysics topics.

Events