Michigan State University’s Board of Trustees approved several infrastructure updates, including an expansion to the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). “The proposed addition adds two more testing end-stations and the additional capacity provided by the building expansion addresses this national need by allowing user teams to test 24/7, eliminating current gaps in testing time needed for user team set-up and take-down,” the resolution said.

Michigan State University’s Board of Trustees voted to approve an expansion to the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The expansion will increase the facility’s ability to test vehicle chips against cosmic rays, the resolution said. Planning costs are estimated at $1 million. 

Using quantum Monte Carlo calculations, researchers from Forschungszentrum Jülich, the University of Bonn, and the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams at Michigan State University computed the overlap between energy states of different Hamiltonians using the floating block method. The floating block method rearranges the time blocks in a stepwise manner by using imaginary (as opposed to real-valued) time evolution for two distinct Hamiltonians to compute the overlap between energy states.

Computing how quantum states overlap

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) posted a highlight titled "Computing how quantum states overlap" about the FRIB research paper titled "Floating Block Method for Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations" published in Physical Review Letters. DOE-SC posts about 200 published research findings annually, selected by their respective program areas in DOE-SC as publication highlights of special note.

As part of Michigan State University’s 2024 MSUFCU Arts Power Up artists-in-residence, Abel Korinsky of Berlin, Germany, is in residence during the spring semester. This inaugural open call for artists is a collaboration between the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams; the MSU Museum; the STEAMpower Project, Michigan State University’s art, science and culture collaborative; and Arts MSU. This new residency fosters collaboration, exploration, experimentation, and innovation on MSU’s vibrant campus, culminating in the creation of groundbreaking artworks at the intersection of art, science and technology.

As part of Michigan State University’s 2024 MSUFCU Arts Power Up artists-in-residence, Abel Korinsky of Berlin, Germany, is in residence during the spring semester. This inaugural open call for artists is a collaboration between the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams; the MSU Museum; the STEAMpower Project, Michigan State University’s art, science and culture collaborative; and Arts MSU. This new residency fosters collaboration, exploration, experimentation, and innovation on MSU’s vibrant campus, culminating in the creation of groundbreaking artworks at the intersection of art, science and technology.

Aaron Philip, a Los Alamos, New Mexico native and Michigan State University student working as a professorial assistant at FRIB, has earned a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship. The Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation provides scholarships to U.S. college freshmen and sophomores who are pursuing research careers in mathematics, natural sciences, and engineering. 

The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) and Impression 5 partnered to create the SMASH: A Nuclear Adventure exhibit, a journey into the world-leading nuclear research done at MSU. This special evening event (SMASH Bash) will offer free admission to the science center so you can try out all of the hands-on activities.

Understanding how a thermonuclear flame spreads across the surface of a neutron star—and what that spreading can tell us about the relationship between the neutron star's mass and its radius—can also reveal a lot about the star's composition. Astrophysicists recently used the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility's Summit supercomputer to compare models of X-ray bursts in 2D and 3D. Other facilities are used to study these astrophysical systems but are tackling other parts of the problem. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, or FRIB, at Michigan State University has launched the world's most powerful heavy ion accelerator. FRIB will explore the proton-rich nuclei that are created by X-ray bursts, and other researchers will be able to use that data to improve their own simulations.

International research teams from Massey University, the University of Mainz, Sorbonne University, and the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) have made notable strides in understanding superheavy elements, reshaping the concept of the periodic table's "island of stability." Their work, featured on the cover of February 2024's Nature Review Physics, alongside a related review in Physics Reports, delves into the atomic electronic structure theory of these elusive elements.

Scientists from Massey University in New Zealand, the University of Mainz in Germany, Sorbonne University in France, and the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) discuss the limit of the periodic table and revising the concept of the "island of stability" with recent advances in superheavy element research. Their work first appeared in Nature Reviews Physics.

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) posted a highlight titled “Statisticians and physicists team up to bring a machine learning approach to mining of nuclear data” about how Bayesian statistical methods help improve the predictability of complex computational models in experimentally unknown research. The authors of the publication are from FRIB and Skidmore College. Each year, scientists publish thousands of research findings in the scientific literature. About 200 of these are selected annually by their respective program areas in DOE-SC as publication highlights of special note.

By colliding heavy ions, physicists at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams in the United States have created five previously unseen nuclear isotopes. Led by Oleg Tarasov at Michigan State University, the team identified the nuclei in the debris produced by the fragmentation of platinum-198.

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) posted a highlight titled “The ‘nested doll’ nucleus nitrogen-9 stretches the definition of a nucleus to the limit.” In a recent study, scientists from Washington University in St. Louis, Fudan University in China, Western Michigan University, the University of Connecticut, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and FRIB present strong evidence for a new light isotope of nitrogen: nitrogen-9, an isotope that is overladen with protons. Each year, scientists publish thousands of research findings in the scientific literature. About 200 of these are selected annually by their respective program areas in DOE-SC as publication highlights of special note.

Scientists at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams have created new extraheavy versions of three silvery metals in an advance that could lead to better understanding of how some elements are forged in stars. None of these five isotopes has ever been created before—at least, not on Earth.

Researchers have synthesized five new isotopes that could help bring the stars down to Earth — and coax scientists a step closer to understanding how collisions between ultra-dense, dead stars could create heavy elements like gold and silver. Their creation took place at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University, and represents a step towards building atoms on Earth that are typically only created in the ultra-turbulent environment around merging dead stars known as neutron stars.

Researchers at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams have synthesized five new isotopes that could help bring the stars down to Earth — and coax scientists a step closer to understanding how collisions between ultra-dense, dead stars could create heavy elements like gold and silver.

New calculations solve an alpha particle physics puzzle

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) posted a highlight titled “New calculations solve an alpha particle physics puzzle” about a new experimental measure of Helium-4’s transition from its ground energy state to an excited state, which closes an apparent gap with theoretical predictions. The study included theorists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Lanzhou, Grand Accelerateur National d’Ions Lourds in France, and the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams. DOE-SC posts about 200 published research findings annually, selected by their respective program areas in DOE-SC as publication highlights of special note.

By breaking apart the nuclei of platinum, physicists led by Oleg Tarasov of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams at Michigan State University have discovered new isotopes of rare-earth elements thulium, ytterbium, and lutetium. It's an achievement that scientists believe will help them understand the properties of neutron-rich nuclei and the processes that forge new elements in the collision of neutron stars.

A team of researchers at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams at Michigan State University recently created and identified five new isotopes. Researchers said this will help them better understand how stars behave. The university said the creation of these isotopes will lead to more significant advancements in nuclear physics.

In creating five new isotopes, an international research team working at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University has brought the stars closer to Earth. The isotopes—known as thulium-182, thulium-183, ytterbium-186, ytterbium-187 and lutetium-190—are reported in the journal Physical Review Letters.

Five new isotopes is just the beginning

Physics Magazine

Less than a year after its opening, the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams produced five never-before-seen isotopes for observation, a success that researchers say highlights the discovery potential of the facility.

Researchers at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) have created five new isotopes. They are the first batch of new isotopes made at FRIB. Researchers say the discoveries will help inform and refine our understanding of fundamental nuclear science.

Long-lived state in radioactive sodium discovered at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) posted a highlight titled “Long-Lived State in Radioactive Sodium Discovered at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams” about the discovery of an unusually long-lived excited state, or isomer, in radioactive sodium-32. DOE-SC posts about 200 published research findings annually, selected by their respective program areas in DOE-SC as publication highlights of special note.

Michigan State University Honors College students Landon Buskirk and Andrew Yeomans-Stephenson, traveled to Hawaii for the joint meeting of the American Physical Society Division of Nuclear Physics and the Physical Society of Japan. The organizing committee selected Buskirk and Yeomans-Stephenson to present at the five-day event, based on papers the students submitted. Both students conduct research at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB).

In FRIB’s first year, its measurements tackled the changes in the structure of the shortest-lived nuclei, exotic decay modes, nuclear reactions that affect cosmic events such as X-ray bursts, and processes in the crusts of neutron stars.

An MSU assistant professor precisely targets cancer cells with diagnostics and therapies using radioisotopes produced by FRIB.

A team of scientists, including researchers from FRIB, published an article in Nature Astronomy on the determination of the equation of state from nuclear experiments and neutron star observations.

The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams after one year of operation

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) posted a highlight titled “The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams after one year of operation” about the experiments performed at FRIB in its first year of operation. DOE-SC posts about 200 published research findings annually, selected by their respective program areas in DOE-SC as publication highlights of special note.

In the news