Members of FRIB User community named 2021 American Physical Society Fellows

Four members of the FRIB user community have been named 2021 Fellows of the American Physical Society (APS): Jason Clark, Christian Forssen, Yury Litvinov, and Artemis Spyrou.

APS is the major professional organization for physicists in the United States. It has over 55,000 members from academia, national laboratories, and industry. The mission of the APS is to advance and diffuse the knowledge of physics for the benefit of humanity, promote physics, and serve the broader physics community.

Fellows are selected for their outstanding contributions to physics. Each year, the number of APS fellows elected is no more than one half of one percent of the membership.

Jason Clark

Jason Clark

Clark is a physicist at Argonne National Laboratory. He is also a member of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics - Center for the Evolution of the Elements (JINA-CEE) executive committee.

Clark was elected for “high-precision mass measurements critical to the understanding of nucleosynthesis, and for development of improved techniques to enable such measurements.”

 
Christian Forssén

Christian Forssén

Forssén is a professor in theoretical physics in the division of Subatomic, High Energy and Plasma Physics within the Department of Physics at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. He is also a member of the FRIB Theory Alliance.

Forssén was elected for “first-principles calculations of the structure of nuclei, especially near the drip-lines, and for the development of precision nuclear forces through innovative uses of statistical methods.”

 Yury Litvinov

Yury Litvinov

Litvinov is a professor and head of the Stored Particles Atomic Physics Research Collaboration (SPARC) Detectors group for FAIR within the Atomic Physics research department at the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research in Germany. He is also an adjunct professor at the University of Heidelberg in Germany.

Litvinov was elected for “outstanding contributions to precision experiments employing heavy-ion storage rings for cross-discipline research in the realm of nuclear structure, atomic physics and astrophysics, and especially for seminal works on radioactive decays of highly-charged nuclides.”

 Artemis Spyrou

Artemis Spyrou

Spyrou is a professor of physics at FRIB and in Michigan State University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy. She is also a member of JINA-CEE.

Spyrou was elected for “studies using total absorption spectroscopy and the beta-Oslo technique to determine neutron-capture rates for astrophysical modeling, and for dedication to communicating science to the general public.”

Read the full MSU Today article about Spyrou.

 Michigan State University (MSU) establishes and operates the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) as a user facility for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC), supporting the mission of the DOE-SC Office of Nuclear Physics. Hosting the most powerful heavy-ion accelerator, FRIB will enable scientists to make discoveries about the properties of rare isotopes in order to better understand the physics of nuclei, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental interactions, and applications for society, including in medicine, homeland security, and industry.

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States and is working to address some of today’s most pressing challenges. For more information, visit energy.gov/science.